The Michelson Cinema Research Library is OPEN

The Michelson Library for Cinema Research is now open for lending at the Internet Archive!

The first 1300+ books and photos have been scanned. 1 million more items await*. The collection is housed at the Internet Archives' digital platform: https://archive.org/details/michelson Lillian Michelson, the renowned film researcher unveiled the first phase of her new digital collection in a virtual ribbon cutting, panel discussion and screening of the documentary, Harold and Lillian: A Hollywood Love Story.

Patrick Mate & director Daniel Raim created this virtual ribbon-cutting video Internet Archive founder, Brewster Kahle, explained why his organization was willing to accept the entire Michelson collection and keep it intact: “A library is more than a collection of books. It is the center of a community. For decades, the Michelson Cinema Research Library informed Hollywood—and we want to see that continue. Many organizations wanted pieces of the collection, but I think the importance of keeping it together is so it can continue to help inspire global filmmakers to make accurate and compelling movies."

Brewster Kahle welcome the Michelson Cinema Research Library
Brewster Kahle & Lillian's Library

When packed, Michelson’s rich collection of 5,000 books, 30,000 photographs, and more than 1,000,000 clippings, scrapbooks and ephemera fill more than two 18-wheel tractor trailers. For 50 years, Michelson’s research informed scores of Hollywood films, including The Right Stuff, Rosemary’s Baby, Scarface, Fiddler on the Roof, Full Metal Jacket, The Graduate, and The Birds. Visit the Michelson Cinema Research Library at Internet Archives' digital platform: https://archive.org/details/michelson

Here's a helpful How-To Guide to make the most of your visit to the the Michelson Library:

https://archive.org/details/michelson-collection-tour * The Internet Archive is a non-profit organization; please help scan more of Lillian's Library by making a tax-deductible donation at: https://archive.org/donate/

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SAVING A LEGACY